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Problem: Fonts appear different when printed with PostScript and in EPS and PDF exported files

Description

Fonts look different when printed with the PostScript printer engine than how they look in ArcMap. This difference is also apparent when viewing ArcMap-generated Encapsulated PostScript (EPS) and Adobe's Portable Document Format (PDF) files in other applications or when printed.

Cause

ArcMap uses TrueType format fonts for all text; however, PostScript, EPS and PDF formats require font information to be stored as a PostScript font: PostScript Type 1 or 3.

Note:
ArcMap supports PostScript Type 1 and OpenType fonts, as well as TrueType fonts at ArcGIS 9.0 and above. Be aware that this document only applies to ArcGIS 8.x. See the link in the Related Information section below for similar issues at 9.x.

ArcMap saves font information in PostScript printer files and EPS and PDF export files either by downloading the TrueType font information as PostScript Type 3 fonts, or by mapping the TrueType fonts to either one of the standard 13 PostScript Type 1 fonts or a resident PostScript font.

Using font mapping enables other applications, such as Adobe Illustrator, to edit text in ArcMap's EPS and PDF export files.

Solution or Workaround

The Font Mapping dialog box is the same for the PostScript printer and for exporting to EPS and PDF formats. The following addresses the dialog from the PDF properties.

  • Set the TrueType fonts to be mapped to resident PostScript Type 1 fonts.
    A. If exporting to EPS or PDF, open the Export Options from the Export dialog box for either format and select the Fonts tab.

    If printing with the PostScript engine, open the PostScript printer properties from the Print dialog box and select the Fonts tab.

    B. Click the Mapped Font column on the row that corresponds to the TrueType font to be mapped.

    C. Select a PostScript Type 1 font to map to, from the dropdown list.

    Some common font mappings are: TrueType 'Arial' to PostScript 'Helvetica', and TrueType 'Times New Roman' to PostScript 'Times-Roman'.

    D. Another option is to enter a new PostScript Type 1 font installed on the device by typing it in. For example, if the Helvetica Narrow PostScript Type 1 font was installed, type Helvetica-Narrow. Use the internal PostScript font name, which is viewed by double-clicking the PostScript font file in the system fonts directory.

    [O] ArcMap font mapping - mapped to PostScript
  • Set ArcMap to download the TrueType font information into the export file as PostScript Type 3 font information.
    A. If exporting to EPS or PDF, open the Export Options from the Export dialog for either format and select the Fonts tab. 

    If printing with the PostScript, open the PostScript printer properties from the Print dialog box and select the Fonts tab.

    B. Click the Mapped Font column on the row that corresponds to the TrueType font to be downloaded.

    C. Select Download characters used.

    [O] ArcMap font mapping - downloading font
    The font characters are converted to outlines and stored in the output file. This option converts only those characters in the specified font that are used in the current ArcMap document.

    Note:
    The text strings with a font that is downloaded are not be editable in other applications.

  • Whether downloading or mapping fonts, apply the settings to the current export only, or save the settings to be used every time.
    A. If exporting to EPS or PDF, open the Export Options from the Export dialog box for either format and select the Fonts tab. 

    If printing with the PostScript, open the PostScript printer properties from the Print dialog box and select the Fonts tab.

    B. Check 'Apply font mapping to the current export file only'. The font mapping settings only apply to the current export and are not saved.

    C. Uncheck 'Apply font mapping to the current export file only' and the font mapping settings are saved and available for exporting to EPS or PDF.

    [O] ArcMap font mapping - apply to current file only

Related Information